Auctions and Auction house · Bonhams

Bonhams Bond Street – December 1st 2018

https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/24880/?department=MOT-CAR

LONDON, NEW BOND STREET
101 New Bond Street
London
W1S 1SR

UK

Bonhams opened a new auction rooms on Bond Street in the centre of London in 2013 and celebrated the opening by hosting a new boutique end of year sale with just 35 lots on offer. That first year they offered the Ecurie Ecosse collection and fetched record amounts for the C-Type and Commer truck among others with a collective $29.6 million in revenue, the following year saw the 1969 Porsche 908/20 lead the way to a $20 million sale and it must be said Bonhams rather took their eyes off the ball as revenues dropped to $13 mil. (2015), $5 mil. (2016) and $11.6 mil. (2017). 2018 does look like a better year for Bonhams although a couple of their lots seem very expensive and some of the prestige lots are not nearly in the realm of the cars offered 2013 and 2014.

Key – Year – Offered/Sold/% – Total gross (US$) – High sale (US$)

2013 30/35 (86%) $29,568,134 $4,762,008 1952 Jaguar C-Type
2014 22/27 (83%) $19,984,807 $3,430,352 1969 Porsche 908/20
2015 23/27 (85%) $13,401,949 $1,360,037 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300SL Gullwing
2016 17/27 (63%) $5,408,059 $821,917 1988 Aston Martin V8
2017 21/35 (60%) $11,587,881 $2,540,251 1985 Ferrari 288GTO

The two marquee lots in 2018 are both Jaguars, one is truly a perfect example of the breed, the other not so much. Bob Tullius’ Group 44 Racing had some success racing E-Types, incl. a Trans Am title in the 1970s and by 1983 took up racing in Group C and IMSA with the FABCAR designed and Tullius funded XJR-5. Despite its impeccable parentage, the XJR-5 was always a little overweight and underpowered and Tom Wheatcroft’ TWR Racing managed to convince the Jaguar board, Castrol and later Silk Cut cigarettes to fund an entirely new racing team. The all new Tony Southgate designed carbon fibre and kevlar composite tub based car was much faster than the XJR-5 and this annoyed Tullius who managed to get an agreement that at least TWR wouldn’t compete in the USA. The XJR-6 as the first TWR racer was named would eventually go on to spawn XJRs that would win Le Mans and take the WEC although like any new racer it had its teething issues in 1985.

#285 which is on offer at Bonhams is one of just three XJR-6s built by TWR racing and raced through 1985 and the chassis that Brundle/Thackwell/Schlesser took to 3rd on the models debut at Mosport, the only car to finish that race. Later sold to a noted Jaguar collector and raced since, this XJR-6 is ready for any possible use, eligible everywhere and offered in pure condition. As for the £2.2 – 2.8 mil. ($3.2 – 3.6 mil.) estimate, it must be noted that Bonhams sold a very good XJR-11 for $1.5 mil. at their Goodwood sale in September and this is estimated at double that figure, its potentially still got value since its one of the pioneers of the TWR race range but crazy expensive all the same, maybe $2.5 mil USD would make more sense.

Otherwise the other marquee Jaguar on offer is one based on the unloved XJ220 which was developed by Jaguar themselves with a V12 engine in the speculative late 1980s, sold out instantly and then changed radically to a turbo V6 that was loosely supposed to be connected to the XJR race engines. The finished article was actually ready for deliveries in 1992, well after the market had tanked and the change in design lead to court action and plenty of buyers choosing to lose their deposits rather than pony up the rest of the money, indeed it was not uncommon to see brand new XJ220s on offer well into the 2000s and they have a reputation for being quick but not the best handling auto. A small series of three XJ-220Cs had been lightly modified for racing by TWR for racing at Le Mans in 1993 and the best of these was the car on offer that won its class and finished 15th overall with Nielsen/Brabham/ Coulthard driving but was promptly disqualified after a rules infringement and never raced again. After periods with some fairly serious collectors, the car is as last raced and offered at the same money as the XJR-6 above which is strong for an XJR-6 that actually won something but absolutely crazy for a car that was disqualified from its one and only race and ridiculous for one based on the XJ-220. What are they thinking, $1 million would be strong money for it, hell this sort of money ($3 million) should get a race winning F40LM or two 911 GT2s.

The Ex-Martin Brundle/Jean-Louis Schlesser/Jan Lammers/Mike Thackwell V12-engined,1985 Jaguar XJR6 World Endurance Championship Group C Racing Coupe Chassis no. 285The Ex-David Coulthard/David Brabham/John Nielsen Le Mans 24-Hour race, GT class-winning, 1993 Jaguar XJ220C COMPETITION COUPE

Another two marquee lots are a fabulous BMW 507 and a rather weird Lister Jaguar. Firstly the BMW was one of the series II 507s and one of just 252 of all types ever made, this particular example was owned by various people before passing to the 507s designer, Count Albrecht Graf von Goertz although it was fitted with a replacement engine and has since been restored. Most 507s have been bouncing around the $2 million mark for a while which is a perfectly fine amount for a rare and beautiful car that can be charitably termed underpowered but Bonhams managed to smash all 507 records with a $5 million sale at their Goodwood FOS sale in July. Now that car was John Surtees personal car that he had owned since he was gifted it new, it had been uniquely improved by BMW for him and was irreplaceable, in the light of that Bonhams are asking £2.1 – 2.2 mil. ($2.7 – 2.8 mil.), which is high, especially for a car with a replacement motor and while Surtees car will be a shot in the arm, it won’t alter that ordinary 507s are still in the low $2s, so perhaps $500k too expensive although a deal should be doable.

The other car is a very, very strange Lister-Jag, BHL103, delivered in parts to Peter Whitehead and built by his mechanic it was raced by both him and Derek Wilkinson before being crashed at Aintree and rebuilt with a new chassis. Later in various top flight collections, the car was finally owned by Shaun Lynn and restored by CKL Developments so that goes some way to countering the fact its not running its original chassis but still not the whole way. Further its stated to be prepared for Historic Motorsport and accepted at any and all events and successful to boot but again its not the original chassis although no doubt rides on a Lister supplied chassis. Plenty of Maserati Birdcages, Listers and all manner of other cars with lightweight tubular spaceframe chassis have this quandary that the traditional ladder chassis cars do not, the latter being easy to repair, the former simply scrapped because it was easier or unsafe to replace. One must then note that the world record for a Lister is BHL101 which fetched $1.98 mil back in 2013 with a good race history and even the better Cunningham cars (BHL123) and pure cars (BHL115) have struggled to top $1.5 million, Lister simply doesn’t have the cachet of its contemporaries. All of that said Bonhams and the vendor have come up with a £2.2 – 2.8 mil. ($2.8 – 3.6 mil.) estimate which seems perhaps twice what I would have pegged it for and even if I am basing my values on outdated figures, I cannot be out by more than 50%, so this is easily $500k – 1 million too expensive.

Formerly owned by Count Albrecht Graf von Goertz, designer of the BMW 507,1958 BMW 507 3.2-Litre Series II RoadsterThe Ex-Peter Whitehead, John Bekaert, Bill de Selincourt,1959 Lister-Jaguar "Knobbly" 3.8-Litre Sports-Racing Two-Seater Chassis no. BHL 103

Elsewhere among the thirty lots on offer are a decent selection of pre-war collectibles, highlights are

  • 1924 Vauxhall 30/98OE Velox Tourer – Est. £330 – 390k ($422 – 500k). Supplied to the Maharaja of Jammu when new and remarkably preserved over its 95 years, restored back in the late ’50s and otherwise a rebuild in ’05 notwithstanding, 30-98s are highly usable Edwardian cars and this is one of the better examples. The price is a touch expensive but the unique history means there is still value.
  • 1937 Lagonda LG45 Rapide – Est. £750 – 850k ($960k – 1.088 mil.). A pioneering British sportscar and one of just 25 with the big 4.5 litre straight six. Recently fully fettled to ensure it runs as well as it looks, this is both well priced and cheap compared to its contemporaries. Great buying and my favourite car of the sale.

1924 Vauxhall 30/98hp OE Velox Tourer1937 Lagonda LG45 Rapide Tourer

Mid century collectibles are another strong point, highlights including:

  • 1954 Arnolt-Bristol Roadster – Est. £250 – 350k ($320 – 448k), restored to a very high standard and eligible for everything, these are fantastic and rare (130 examples) little cars although 130bhp is not exactly sizzling. Priced right.
  • 1964 Aston Martin DB5 Saloon – Est. £640 – 723k ($819 – 870k). A very well maintained original car in RHD limits values somewhat and this car begs inspection, if its better than a mere driver quality car with needs it could be value, otherwise avoid.
  • 1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast – Est. £1.3 – 1.4 mil. ($1.66 – 1.79 mil.). A beautiful and very large RHD Fezza with much to lile, restored way back in ’81 by Terry Hoyle, this may need further work at some point although noted to be in 2- condition at Monterey in August where it failed at a $1.3 mil. hammer, will have more appeal in UK and value at the estimate.
  • 1966 Aston Martin DB6 Volante – Est. £1.4 – 1.6 mil. ($1.8 – 2 mil.). 6th of just 37 crossover convertibles built with DB5 chassis and DB6 bodywork, stated to have done just 1000 miles in the last 30 years. Stated to be a once in a lifetime opportunity but engine and gearbox changes and RHD should limit values, gorgeous though it is, surely low $1 million would be closer to value.
  • 1969 Cooper T90 F5000 – Est. £115 – 135k ($147 – 173k). 1 of just 3 built, the final Cooper racing car and designed for F5000 competition. Restored some years ago and will require a thorough recommissioning but good value for what it is, a very fast and relatively cheap way to have fun.
  • 1973 Ferrari 246 GTS – Est. £450 – 550k ($576 – 704k). Very rare in RHD and recent restoration work to the highest quality by Hoyle Fox and others. Still the price is $100k more than market so quality needs to be concours or very near.

1954 Arnolt-Bristol Bolide Roadster Carrozzeria Bertone1966 Aston Martin DB6 4.2-litre Short-Chassis VolanteA rare 'Chairs & Flairs' example,1973 Ferrari Dino 246 GTS Spider

Modern motoring is not such a big deal at the Bond Street sale although a couple of options have eclectic appeal:

  • 1975 Ferrari 365GT4/BB – Est. £260 – 290k ($333 – 371k). A beautiful example in great and rare colours. Noted to be in excellent condition and priced slightly below market.
  • 1979 Rolls-Royce Phantom VI Limousine – Est. £250 – 300k ($320 – 384k). Absolutely the last word in luxury, owned by R-R since new as part of their demonstration fleet. IF a new Phantom isn’t enough bling for you, this will be. A touch expensive but it is unique.
  • 2016 Jaguar F-Type Roadster Project 7 Roadster – Est. £150 – 200k ($192 – 256k), This is both kinda cool and very rare BUT its still just a new gussied up F-Type. Rare type Lambos and Ferraris are many multiples of this price so if you are a supercar collector looking for something edgy, why not?
  • 2017 Aston Martin Vanquish Zagato – Est. £550 – 650k ($704 – 832k). Perhaps the most beautiful of the recent supercars. As new and very rare and pricing doesn’t look too bad.

2017 Aston Martin Vanquish Zagato CoupéThe factory demonstrator,c.1979 Rolls-Royce Phantom VI Limousine  Chassis no. PGH1162016 Jaguar F Type Project 7 Roadster

Bonhams are offering an eclectic collection of collectibles with the thirty lots offering something for everyone. That said the estimates are often strong to what the hell strong so it will be very interesting to see what they can get over the line.


Key – Lot # – Year/Make/Model/Serial/VIN – Est. (UKP) – (EURO) – (US$)

1 1959 Jaguar XK150S 3.4 Coupe T836271DN £60,000 £80,000 € 67,800 €90,400 $76,800 $102,400 Red over Red leather. RHD. via JDNY to unknown, MR. Thompson, CA, USA, UK by ’04, converted to RHD, via JD Classics to Mr Joaquin Ramírez Fernández, As offered here his Jaguar XK150S is equipped with a Moto-lita four-spoke steering wheel and well-presented bucket seats while the car’s original steering wheel and seats are also included with the Lot. The car’s driveability has been greatly enhanced by provision of 5-speed transmission, while both its disc-brake system and the alternator have been uprated. The car is also accompanied by a history file including a Jaguar operating, maintenance and service handbook; JDHT Certificate; photographs; restoration invoices from P&K Thornton (late 1990s-early 2000s); some MoTs and correspondence; V5C registration document; and, of course, a copy of this Formula 1 celebrity owner’s engrossing book.
2 2004 Aston Martin DB7 Zagato Coupe SCFAE12303K700081 £250,000 £300,000 € 282,500 €339,000 $320,000 $384,000 Metallic Grey over Grey leather. RHD. Number ’81’ of the 99 cars produced, this example was purchased by the retired motor engineer owner in 2017 for his select private collection, though advancing years have made him decide to sell the Zagato having barely used it. The car has had four former keepers, the last of whom was a Mr Stevens who acquired it in 2008. Four MoT certificates on file show the mileage increasing from 12,334 in 2014 to 14,272 in 2017, and the car also comes with a V5C registration document, together with two ‘Zagato’ branded car covers one for indoor, the other for outdoor use.
3 1924 Vauxhall 30/98OE Velox Tourer OE115 £330,000 £390,000 € 372,900 €440,700 $422,400 $499,200 Bare metal and Green over Green leather. RHD. Hari Singh, last ruling Maharaja of Jammu and Kashmir, India (1), Unusually, the Maharajah wanted his 30/98 to be completely symmetrical; why is not known. To this end he ordered a handbrake on the passenger’s side and a door on the driver’s side (which was non-standard), though both of these features were non-functioning. Also ordered with a split windscreen and two ‘ship’s ventilators’ on the scuttle, ‘OE115’ is the only Vauxhall to have the aforementioned peculiarities, Lt Colonel R Byrne of Peshawar ’47 (2), sold to an artist in Pakistan (3), unknown, stored, Samuel E Woods, USA ’54, Clarence B Petty, MA, USA, Edgar L Roy ’58, restored, George Gentsch ’71, Gerald Batt, UK ’80, Judy Daniels ’91, Mark Stimson ’05, rebuilt by Temptleton Engineering, vendor ’05. Very well maintained. Delightful and ready to use, this unique and well documented example of Vauxhall’s definitive sports car of the Vintage period is offered with a UK V5C Registration Certificate and a quite remarkable history file containing correspondence from previous owners, magazine articles, period photographs, 30/98 Register extract, etc. Quite simply, this is the finest 30-98 ever to be offered by Bonhams and worthy of the closest inspection.
4 2016 Jaguar F-Type Roadster Project 7 Roadster SAJAC7049GMK30759 £150,000 £200,000 € 169,500 €226,000 $192,000 $256,000 Blue over Black leather. RHD. Purchased in 2017 with only 26 miles recorded, this ultimate Jaguar has covered only some 360 miles from new and comes complete with all books, tools, etc. Serviced by main agents Jaguar Droitwich immediately prior to sale, this ultra-rare car is presented in effectively as new condition. An opportunity not to be missed to join the select band of Project 7 owners.
5 1988 Aston Martin V8 Vantage X-Pack SCFCV81V1JTR12595 £270,000 £340,000 € 305,100 €384,200 $345,600 $435,200 Cannock Black with dark red-piped black interior trim and matching carpets. RHD. X-Pack engine (number ‘V580/2595XA’) from new, automatic gearbox and sunroof, via Reg Vardy Ltd to Mr David Tye, history documented but not given, Germany from ’06, Australia since. The service history details works carried out by Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd and independent marque specialists such as Aston Workshop, Ian Mason, and Nicholas Mee. Dated 10th January 2011, an Aston Workshop invoice details the removal of a manual gearbox and installation of a four-speed automatic unit, thus returning the car to – broadly – original specification (the original auto ‘box would have been a three-speeder). Other works carried out at this time included fitting new aluminium radiator and re-carpeting the interior in red. Previously, in December 2008, Aston Workshop had replaced both sills and carried out a re-spray. The service history only goes back as far as 1995 when a replacement service booklet was issued. The most recent servicing bill was issued by Nicholas Mee on 28th June 2012 at 465 miles (assumed to be 100,465 miles from new), while MoT certificates and other bills track the recorded mileage increasing from 62,869 miles in April 2001 to 1,731 (101,731) miles in January 2018. Fine example.
6 1958 Aston Martin DB Mark III DHC AM300/3/1609 £480,000 £680,000 N/R € 542,400 €768,400 $614,400 $870,400 British Racing Green over Black leather. 1 of 85 DHCs. RHD. Overdrive manual. via Guy Salmon Automobiles Ltd to Mr Peter Cadbury (1), R.J. Horner (2), unknown, Mr. Lee ’80s, Wulf Muller, Germany, restored by Norbert Hieber, unknown, UK, Dietmar Binkowska, Germany ’03, via Aston Workshop to unnamed vendor ’09. Related invoices and photographs are on file together with expired MoT certificates suggesting that the Aston subsequently returned to the UK. It appears that the car was scarcely driven during the 1990s, the mileage recorded on the MoT certificates increasing from 11,130 miles in 1989 to 12,297 miles in March 1999. Always meticulously maintained, this DB MkIII has been enjoyed by the current owner for the past 9 years. He recently changed the exterior colour to the very attractive British Racing Green, which suits the car admirably, the repaint being carried out to the highest standard by a local specialist. The owner has also had (adjustable) electric power steering installed by specialists EZ Power Steering in Holland. The early ‘DB’ Astons were frequently criticised for their heavy steering, and this simple and easily reversible modification makes them a dream to drive. The car is well presented and has a beautifully patinated interior and highly original engine compartment. Sold only because of a lack of space and the vendor tells us it is ready for any journey. The car comes with current Belgian registration papers; FIVA Passport (2011); Aston Martin Certificate of Origin; a selection of photographs; old German registration papers; and the aforementioned documentation.
7 1999 Aston Martin Vantage V600 Le Mans SCFDAM2S7XBR70254 £425,000 £475,000 € 480,250 €536,750 $544,000 $608,000 Aston Martin Racing Green over Saddle Tan. RHD. 19th of 40 examples. trim, this limited edition Vantage Le Mans – number ’19’ of the 40 made – was delivered new in the ultimate V600 specification (as opposed to being upgraded subsequently) and with the close-ratio manual gearbox. In October 2001, at the first owner’s request, Aston Martin Works installed a four-speed automatic gearbox (the original gearbox was kept should a future owner wish to return the car to original specification). This Le Mans has had only two registered owners from new, and with a mere c.1,500 miles recorded, must possibly be one of the lowest mileage and very best examples in existence. In February 2017 the car was comprehensively serviced by Aston Martin Works. It comes complete with its original sales invoice, handbooks, tool kit, spare key and stirling silver fob, road map, torch, indoor fitted car cover and dedicated V8 Vantage Le Mans factory book signed by Roy Salvadori and Carroll Shelby. Details of its service history and copies of the original factory build records are available also. One of only 30 examples reputedly produced with the 600bhp engine, this hand-built, aluminium-bodied Vantage remains one of the most powerful models Aston Martin has ever produced, and is both rare and highly collectible.
8 1975 Ferrari 365GT4/BB 18685 £260,000 £290,000 € 293,800 €327,700 $332,800 $371,200 Rosso Corboda and NEro over Crema leather. RHD. Exhibited at the 60th London Motor Show at Earls Court on Maranello Concessionaires’ stand, via Maranello Concessionaires and A L Harding & Sons (1) in Cambridge, Mr John MacDonald (1), Mr Ward ’87 (2), re-trimmed by Mike Presgrave of Moto-Trim, Adams McCall Engineering Ltd of Buckinghamshire totally stripped and repainted the car, with much mechanical detailing to the engine, suspension, and brakes etc, some £16,000-plus being spent on it, via Nigel Mansell Sportscars to Mr. Mills (3), via Porters and Portfield to Mr. McCarthy (4), maintained by Maranello, Talacrest, and Graypaul. In 1996, at 32,384 miles recorded, the engine was damaged following the failure of an oil pressure relief valve, requiring a full strip-down and rebuild by Maranello Concessionaires Ltd costing some £9,526, while a new differential was fitted at the same time. In 1997, Maranello Concessionaires Ltd/Ferrari UK stripped and repainted the car for a second time, via Radley Motors to Mr Sherwood (5), Mr Moore (6), via Legends to Mr. Richardson ’09 (7), mechanically rebuilt by Vince Mezzullo, unknown (8), vendor (9). Received a service and replacement cam belts at SMDG Ferrari, at 41,111 miles, generally excellent condition (the engine and transmission still require running in.
9 1985 Jaguar XJR6 285 £2,200,000 £2,800,000 € 2,486,000 €3,164,000 $2,816,000 $3,584,000 British Racing Green over race. Mosport Park 1000km ’85 #52 Brundle/Thackwell/Schlesser 3rd, Spa 1000km ’85 Schlesser/Heyer DNF, Brands Hatch ’85 Lammers/Heyer DNF, Mount Fuji ’85 Heyer/Soper DNF, Selangor 800km ’85 Lammers/Brancatelli DNF, tested at Estoril in ’86, redone as a XJR-6 with 6.5 litre engine and Silk Cut livery, Campbell McLaren (1), via Bonhams Goodwood ’99 to David Coplowe (2), John Pearson (3), vendor (4). This mouth-wateringly-attractive TWR Jaguar XJR-6 Coupe is offered complete with a most comprehensive documentation file which includes many fascinating TWR team documents including original set-up, race and test paperwork, a considerable proportion of it hand-written by the TWR team engineers in the field. The documents present include a copy of the team’s December 9, 1985 ‘TWR Jaguar Group C Proposal 1986’ detailing intended development and disposition of existing chassis ‘185’, ‘285’ and ‘385’, while new cars ‘186’, ‘286’ and ‘386’ were described at the time as “commence build mid-January’, ‘…end of Feb’ ” and “…assemble into complete monocoque only”. Indeed, for any enthusiastic new owner close inspection of the documentation file can be as interesting – and certainly as illuminating – as inspection of this magnificent endurance racing Coupe itself.
10 1966 Ferrari 500 Superfast 8459SF £1,300,000 £1,400,000 € 1,469,000 €1,582,000 $1,664,000 $1,792,000 Blu Chiaro over Naturale leather. RHD. via to Jack S. Durlacher, UK (1), unknown, via Nigel Dawes ’76, restored by Terry Hoyle Engineering ’81, unnamed, incl. Manoukian Brothers ’92 – ’07, via Bonhams Olympia ’07 $525k to vendor. The car’s restoration has held up well, although there are some signs of use, including some minor dents in the nose and a chip on one headlight. Its color scheme, which, as mentioned, is the original used in 1966, and was utilized on only three of the 500 Superfasts, is still highly attractive, with a wonderful period flavor. Further, the car is still fitted with the original engine, and is offered with a partial tool roll. Offered at RM Monterey ’18 Not sold $1.75 – 2 mil.
11 1986 Aston Martin V8 Vantage Zagato 20049 £450,000 £550,000 € 508,500 €621,500 $576,000 $704,000 Red over Cream leather. RHD. ‘20049’ was delivered to the immediately preceding owner from Stratton Motor Co by covered transporter and kept in their dehumidified storage facility in a Carcoon. In an accompanying letter dated 31st March 1998, Stratton Motor Company states that it had collected the Zagato by transporter from Newport Pagnell on 12th November 1987 before selling it to a Mr Saunderson, who never took delivery. During subsequent changes of ownership, the car never left Stratton’s storage facility. When it was eventually registered in January 1990 to Mr Michael Fleming, the car had still not been used. Stratton’s later reacquired it. Their managing Director, Roger Bennington, concludes the letter by saying: ‘The only person to have driven this Zagato since leaving the factory is myself, on the occasional removal from storage to run the engine.’ The Aston was not used while in the immediately preceding ownership. Regular maintenance was carried out ‘in house’ by the then owner’s workshop personnel and resident fully qualified Aston Martin mechanical engineer, ensuring the car remained ‘on the button’. This included regularly running the engine up to full operating temperature and yearly replacement of all fluids, filters, and the battery. The current vendor purchased the Zagato in 2014 and had it taken to Aston Martin Works to be tested; all fluids were changed and the car was then re-checked before being returned to professional storage where it has been ever since. This exceptional Zagato remains 100% factory correct, even down to retaining the protective wax coating sprayed over the engine bay before it left Newport Pagnell. Freshly MoT’d, it is offered with owner’s handbook, old-style logbook, V5C registration document, and its Vehicle Storage Maintenance Log detailing dates and mileage of all works carried out since acquisition. With only some 393 miles recorded, this rare and desirable British thoroughbred supercar is presented in effectively ‘as new’ condition and thus represents a unique opportunity for collectors.
12 1966 Citroen DS21 Decapotable 4371577 £150,000 £180,000 € 169,500 €203,400 $192,000 $230,400 Silver over Black leather. RHD. The scarcity of right hand drive examples is partly accounted for by the very high price which was almost double the price of the already expensive closed Berline version (in 1963 a DS19 Decapotable Usine listed in the UK at over £2,700 being 40% more than a new E-Type Jaguar!). Furthermore by 1966 the UK regulations required that all new cars must have provision for 3 point mounting front seat belts. It was not only Citroen with their Decapotable who struggled to comply with this requirement! This is most probably the reason why this particular car was not registered in the UK upon delivery and was sent to Malta in 1968 without having been registered in the UK. It is believed that only one further DS21 Decapotable Usine was delivered to the UK after this one. During its 45 years in Malta this DS was used sparingly and in dry weather only. This car remains exceptionally original and completely free of the rust problems suffered by so many DS Citroens. The car retains its original matching engine which runs with full oil pressure, no smoke and ample power. It retains its beautifully original soft black full leather interior and even its original “capot”, or hood, which is in remarkable original and preserved condition. It is even accompanied by its original Chapron supplied jack, unique to this model! Furthermore the car has many “impossible to falsify” details unique to the genuine decapotable model, for example : the brackets for the rear brake pipes are period correct (changed on 1969 model year), the early type of front and rear suspension pushrod ball cups which are integral with the rear arms and front sub-frames (this design was changed in 1966). Additionally there is no sign of either corrosion or repair to the chassis, anywhere (very important for a DS) and it is believed that it is just as it left the factory. Brought back to the UK four years ago, KSA 381F is offered fresh from a major service carried out by renowned marque specialists Andrew Brodie Engineering in June 2018 (bill on file). Works included fitting a new clutch, new front brake discs, new timing chain, electronic ignition, up-rated alternator, electric fuel pump, 4 new Michelin XAS tyres (the DS was designed to use this tyre) and also in the interests of safety and reliability the hydraulic system was converted to use green LHM fluid while retaining the original appearance. Following these works the DS completed a trouble free and effortless trip to the south of France. Accompanying documentation includes old MOT certificates, a Malta registration document, various invoices from Andrew Brodie Engineering Ltd, full documentation and authentication from Citroen Heritage. Offered with its original English text owner’s handbook and repair manual, this rare and ultra desirable convertible DS21 is ready for the next owner to use and enjoy.
14 1969 Cooper T90 F5000 F1C/3/69 £115,000 £135,000 € 129,950 €152,550 $147,200 $172,800 Orange single seat race car. 1 of 3 built. Peter Rehl, USA (1), 5 litre engine fitted, Lime Rock ’69 Rehl 1st, Elkhart Lake ’69 Rehl 7th, Lime Rock ’69 Rehl 9th, Bryar ’69 Rehl 1st, Lime Rock ’69 Rehl 7th, Ste. Jovite ’69 Rehl 27th, Daytona ’69 Rehl 1st, Riverside ’70 Rehl 24th, unknown, competed in F5000, vendors, restpred by Peter Rehl and Dick Yagami, Pat Prince of Prince Racing, John Grubb at J&J Racing, Phil Harris at TrueChoice and Bill McCurdy of Williams Racing, but also Bob McKee of McKee Engineering and original Cooper Car Co specialist Tony Whitburn who led this car’s original build at Canada Road, Byfleet back in 1969. The seller reports that the car has been run infrequently post restoration, and subsequently carefully ‘pickled’/drained of fluids such that it is ready for its next outing. Accompanying the car are its original wheels, which might serve as decoration than use, and the original alloy nose piece, itself an appealing item.
15 1959 Lister-Jaguar Knobbly BHL103 £2,200,000 £2,800,000 € 2,486,000 €3,164,000 $2,816,000 $3,584,000 British Racing Green over race. RHD. Peter Whitehead (1), built by Arthur Birks, raced, Derek Wilkinson (2), raced with great success, crashed at Aintree and rebuilt with a new chassis, Bill de Selincourt (3), Allan Deacon, Bert Young, Count Hubertus Donhoff, Germany, Hans-Peter Gluck ’82, Shaun Lynn, restored by CKL Developments. Seldom have we seen such a highly-successful, high-profile and so widely well-respected an Historic sports-racing car as this highly original Lister-Jaguar. Widely known and affectionately remembered over such a long career within the club and Historic racing world, ‘NBL 660′ is presented here accompanied not only by valuable spares but also one of the most massive, immensely well-researched and detailed documentation files that we have ever encountered. Perhaps most notably – given the towering present-day profile of the Goodwood Revival and Members’ Meetings, and of the Le Mans Classic, ‘NBL 660’ here won at Goodwood in period and has been a familiar entry in both the Sussex circuit’s wonderful Historic races while former owner Udo Ruutcher made quite an impression in the 2002 Le Mans event, followed by tremendous subsequent success for later owner/driver Shaun Lynn. How successful was ‘NBL 660’ back in period, 1958-1963? Remarkably, its documented record includes no fewer than 53 podium places, including 29 firsts, 15 seconds and 9 thirds. Also included within this Lot is a remarkable spares inventory, amazingly including the car’s original 1958 chassis frame – which was replaced in-period after an accident in 1959, subsequently built into another Lister-Jaguar but retrieved to rejoin ‘NBL 660’ in recent years. There is also a spare engine, a set of original Weber DCO carburettors and multiple suspension, mechanical and sheet metal parts. Mr Lynn’s extensive racing record with ‘NBL 660’ is fully recorded within the documentation file, which also includes extensive reference to a period in 2010 when a rival Lister-Jaguar came up for sale at Bonhams. That ex-Japanese Collection car had been campaigned by an Historic racing owner/driver named Bob Gilbert. It had actually been assembled by veteran Lister-Jaguar specialist John Pearson for a Japanese friend of historian Doug Nye’s back in the early 1980s. It was based upon a chassis frame which was described to the commissioning client as being an original Lister-made Abbey Road, Cambridge, chassis frame which had been removed from a genuine car in period because the perfectionist contemporary owner believed that it had been damaged in an accident which had befallen his car. This frame is understood in fact to have been the original from ‘NBL 660’; as acquired by Peter Whitehead back in 1958 and as removed from the car now offered here following John Bekaert’s Aintree crash during the 1959 British Grand Prix meeting. That ‘perfectionist owner’ would have been Derek Wilkinson, and it emerged that the discarded chassis frame had subsequently been acquired by Mr Pearson. The Bob Gilbert car was properly described by our contemporary catalogue and, to prevent the possibility of any future confusion or dispute over historic provenance, Shaun Lynn bought it at that 2010 Sale. He then had CKL Developments dismantle it to retrieve its original 1958/first-part of 1959 ‘NBL 660’ frame, which could become available for a rebuild – if ever required – of his replacement-framed (in-period) – and again perfectly genuine – post-Aintree ’59 continuous-history ‘NBL 660’. This bare repaired original ‘BHL 103’ (aka ‘NBL 660’) chassis was then retained by Mr Lynn for potential display alongside this long-owned, much-raced Historic Lister-Jaguar. And ‘NBL 660’ was also photographed alongside the ex-Bob Gilbert car – re-assembled around a new-made identical replacement frame – and ‘Nibble’s retrieved, now-bare, initial chassis. We believe that the 1959 replacement frame built into ‘NBL 660’ at that time was not in fact the last ‘Knobbly’ chassis, but a square-tube crossmember/revised suspension pick-ups ‘Costin’ Lister frame as was current that year. As presented here the car is offered in ready-to-run order, complete with its valuable original-specification D-Type gearbox), carefully preserved and unraced since former owner/driver Shaun Lynn’s last appearance in it, although it was driven by multiple Indy ‘500’ winner Dario Franchitti to lead the field pre-start at the spring Goodwood 75th Members’ Meeting in 2017. Lister-Jaguar ‘NBL 660’ really is one of the backbone cars of Historic racing history, having been so long campaigned within the category ever since its true inception more than forty years ago now, back in the 1970s. And now it can be your’s…
16 1954 Arnolt-Bristol Roadster 404/X/3065 £250,000 £350,000 € 282,500 €395,500 $320,000 $448,000 Green over Cream. Cali, USA car, via Bristol Cars UK to vendor, restored and classic raced/rallied.Experienced professional restorers, the vendors commenced the restoration with the intention of racing and rallying the Arnolt-Bristol in historic events such as the HERO Cup, Mille Miglia, and Goodwood. Due to unforeseen circumstances their plans have changed, hence the car is now offered for sale. The full restoration was undertaken between 2015 and 2017 to period-correct specification, with all components being fully rebuilt (not just cleaned and painted). The body was fully repaired, retaining as much of the original panelling as possible, and then repainted to concours standard in the correct shade of green, traces of the original paintwork having been discovered during the restoration process, while the interior was re-trimmed in tan leather. Intended for use in an ex-Grand Prix Cooper-Bristol, the engine has been built to race specification by a leading Bristol engine specialist. Maximum power output is around 130bhp. The gearbox was overhauled with all modifications needed for racing, and the car also has an aluminium foam-filled competition fuel tank; an aluminium cooling radiator; and an oil cooler. A full account of this car’s restoration may be found in John Simister’s excellent article in Octane magazine (February 2018 edition, copy available).Not just built to an exceptionally high standard, this car also has very good road manners, as Simister discovered: ‘And what a keen thing it is. I’m being gentle at first while I get to know the Bolide’s behaviour, but the throttle is super-crisp at small, openings yet without a trace of snatch. The clutch is light and progressive, the long, cranked gearlever with its Bakelite knob clicks with oily smoothness into its ratio-slots. Conducting the Arnolt with driver-flattering fluidity is disarmingly easy. Even a double-declutch down into the non-synchronised first gear is a piece of cake. ‘Precise steering, confident straight-line stability, a benign balance but lots of scope for tightening the trajectory on the throttle(s) once settled into a bend: the Arnolt has all these things. It’s a straightforward, talkative, transparent four-wheel drifter, which does what you ask it to do and clearly enjoys every minute. To race one of these would be very entertaining.’
17 1964 Jaguar Mark 2 3.8 Saloon 233517 £50,000 £60,000 € 56,500 €67,800 $64,000 $76,800 Black over Grey leather. RHD. The superb example offered here has been restored and rebuilt in the style of the racing Mark 2 saloons prepared and entered by Guildford-based Jaguar dealer John Coombs in the early 1960s. A Jaguar/Daimler dating letter on file reveals that chassis number ‘233517’ was originally finished in dark blue with light blue trim (the same as it is today) and was retailed via Henlys. The Jaguar retains its original registration number, ‘HPA 300C’. This car’s history is not known prior to 1989 when it was acquired by Mr Ongun of London, to whom the aforementioned letter was addressed. Next owner Mr Vann acquired ‘HPA 300C’ in 1992 and it was he that commissioned its restoration. The no-expense-spared rebuild was commenced by marque specialists Three Point Four and completed in November 1997 by Scott-Moncrieff (see bills and photographs on file). The car was subsequently re-trimmed by renowned experts Suffolk & Turley. Its specification includes a rebuilt, balanced, and tuned engine; 2″ SU carburettors on matching manifolds; front anti-roll bar; Koni shock absorbers; up-rated coil springs to the front suspension; Coombs-type rear wheelarches; Coombs-type chromed wire wheels; Moto-Lita wood-rimmed steering wheel; Pioneer stereo system; and discreet period-style circular mirrors to the window frames. The Jaguar remained with Mr Vann for the next 20-or-so years before being sold to the current vendor, a prominent private collector, by which time it had covered only some 8,000 miles since the restoration and was still in ‘exemplary condition’. While in the vendor’s care, ‘HPA 300C’ has been fastidiously maintained by Red Triangle, as evidenced by their bills on file. Presented in generally excellent condition, this discreetly upgraded 3.8-litre Mk2 is offered with the 2016 purchase receipt, copies of old V5/V5C documents, and the aforementioned invoices, etc.
18 1960 Jaguar XK150S 3.8 Coupe T825157DN £130,000 £150,000 € 146,900 €169,500 $166,400 $192,000 Black and Red leather. RHD. Representing the XK150 in its ultimate configuration, with the 3.8-litre engine and overdrive gearbox, this rare ‘S’ fixed-head coupé was supplied to its first owner, a Mr Douglass Growcott, by Henlys of London on 23rd March 1960. The car is recorded in Anders Ditlev Clausager’s definitive book on the Jaguar XK150 as being the 71st of a total production run of only 115 right-hand drive cars. It is also one of only five cars finished in black with a red interior. This XK150 has had only four recorded owners from new: the third acquiring ‘660 NPJ’ in 1965 and keeping the car some 35 years until 2000, and the last keeping it for the remaining 18 years. There are MoT certificates on file dating back to 1984 showing the then indicated mileage as 71,442, while virtually continuous MoTs to date confirm the current mileage shown as 82,028. In 2003 the engine and gearbox were fully rebuilt, the former incorporating an unleaded cylinder head conversion, and the car has also been the subject of considerable expenditure to maintain it in its present beautiful condition. Improvements to the original specification include the fitting of power steering, upgraded brakes, electric fan, alternator conversion, inertia seat belts, and a 12-volt battery installation. The car has been fully checked through by the leading XK specialists, Twyford Moors, who during the process completely rebuilt the front suspension incorporating a full Polybush upgrade to further improve the handling. This is a matching-numbers car with a mechanical overdrive, rarely seen on these XKs. Fitted with virtually new chrome wire wheels and Vredestein radial tyres, ‘660 NPJ’, with its subtle upgrades, is said to be a delight to drive; the experience being enhanced by one of the smoothest gearboxes one is likely to find in any XK. In addition to various invoices for works undertaken, the accompanying file contains Jaguar handbooks, the original buff logbook, a current V5C registration document, and a Heritage Certificate confirming its production numbers and current registration. Described by the vendor as in excellent condition, with a very nice interior, ‘660 NPJ’ represents a wonderful opportunity for the serious Jaguar collector to acquire a rare example of one of the most powerful limited-production XKs manufactured by Jaguar Cars.
19 1937 Lagonda LG45 Rapide 12267R/G10 £750,000 £850,000 € 847,500 €960,500 $960,000 $1,088,000 British Racing Green over Green leather and Fawn hood. RHD. via Keevil & March to S. Baker (1), unknown, Norman Kimmersley, J. Stone, Ken King, Dr. Hurst ’56, via auction ’84 to Simon Carell, restored by Alan Brown, George Chilberg, CA, unnamed ’13, vendor. Since arriving back home in the UK, the Lagonda has been mechanically fettled by the experts at Bishops Grey, and repainted by MotoTechnique in the original green (matched from a scrap of paint found behind the dashboard during the stripping process). It was also re-trimmed by O’Rourke Trimming in correct, full-thickness Connolly hide, with traditional seat-stuffing materials, while the hood, side screens, and tonneau were replaced in the original and correct fawn colour. Expertly revitalised, the Rapide successfully completed the ‘Flying Scotsman’ rally in April of this year having been acquired by the current owner – only the eighth from new – in 2015.
20 1957 Rolls-Royce Silver Cloud DHC SBC118 £350,000 £450,000 € 395,500 €508,500 $448,000 $576,000 Dark Blue over Beige leather. RHD. via George Newman to J P W Maynard Esq (1), original colour scheme was Valentine’s light grey with dark blue Connolly leather interior and black hood, M.E. Kirkpatrick ’61 (2), Richard Himmel, USA ’84 (3), vendor (4). When the current owner purchased the car it had been repainted bronze and was in a good driving condition though showing signs of age. Accordingly, the owner commissioned an extensive restoration to the highest standard, which was carried out by Noblehouse in the Netherlands. The exterior colour scheme was changed again, on this occasion to the very attractive dark blue with matching hood and beige interior, which it retains today. The restoration was finished in 2000 and the Rolls-Royce registered for the road in Belgium. Since then it has been used regularly but only in good weather, covering around 15,000 miles over the course of the last 18 years. The vendor advises us that this Silver Cloud has been maintained meticulously, receiving its last major service in 2013. At the same time the rear axle was renewed and the final drive ratio changed to enable high-speed cruising at reduced revs, while the engine, cooling system, steering mechanism, and ventilation system were checked over by Leo Stoffels in the Netherlands, as confirmed by bills on file totalling over €15,000. Accompanying documentation also includes copies of the Rolls-Royce and Mulliner build sheets; copy old US title; FIVA Identity Card (issued 2002); taxation report (dated 2000); Belgian registration papers; and invoices for parts and work carried out totalling an estimated €80,000-plus.
21 1966 Aston Martin DB6 Volante DBVC/2306/R £1,400,000 £1,600,000 € 1,582,000 €1,808,000 $1,792,000 $2,048,000 Light Metallic Green over Cream leather. RHD. 6th of 37 examples. ZF five-speed gearbox fitted, originally finished in Platinum with black interior trim and matching Everflex hood. Chrome wheels, a Motorola radio, and a power-operated aerial are the only items of non-standard equipment listed. Messrs Granville Restaurant (1), Roland Duce ’79 (2?), Godfrey Nelson Knowles ’85 (3?), Mr A J Wilmot-Smith ’87 (4?), William Loughran (5?), Auto gearbox fitted, later returned to manual, William Hemmings ’02 (6?), William Loughran ’09 (7?), the car subsequently received a full engine rebuild (in 2014) and was converted to 4.2-litre specification (using a new cylinder block) and unleaded compatibility. The engine rebuild was undertaken by marque specialists, Post Vintage, and cost nearly £50,000. Related bills are on file together with others including those for an interior re-trim by Autotrim of Huddersfield in 1990. Also on file are numerous old MoTs dating back as far as 1987 showing that the car (previously registered ‘PVV 1’) has covered fewer than 1,000 miles in 30 years, Mr. Riley (8?), William Loughran (9?), vendor (10?). Included in the sale is the original cylinder block, and the car also comes with a reprint/copy DB6 Volante Instruction Book, current V5C document, and copies of old V5s.
22 1980 Aston Martin V8 Volante V8COR/15146 £160,000 £200,000 € 180,800 €226,000 $204,800 $256,000 Jubilee Silver over Magnolia leather. RHD. Chassis number ‘15146’ has been owned by the current vendor from new and has become very well known in London’s fashionable Mayfair district. The accompany (copy) Car Record Card shows that the car was originally finished in Jubilee Silver with dark blue trim and matching hood. As one would expect, the Volante has been maintained regardless of cost; it has wanted for nothing and Aston Martin Works carried out all servicing and maintenance until recently when renowned marque specialists Oselli took over. There are bills on file from Aston Martin Lagonda Ltd for the period 1995 to 2011 totalling £125,000. Works carried out by AML include replacing the hood; an engine rebuild and unleaded conversion (1999-2000); bodywork repairs (2001); a full interior re-trim (2004); and further refurbishment of the bodywork, trim, and paint on various occasions between 2005 and 2008. In addition, some £11,500 was spent with marque specialists Oselli in 2012 for works on the chassis, suspension, brakes, and gearbox. There other invoices present for more minor works, while numerous expired MoTs on file show the recorded mileage increasing from 72,859 in 1996 to 29,905 (129,905) in 2014. Finished in Jubilee Silver with blue-piped Magnolia trim, this beautiful one-owner Volante is presented in excellent condition and offered with an V5C document.
23 1973 Ferrari 246 GTS 07586 £450,000 £550,000 € 508,500 €621,500 $576,000 $704,000 Nero over Nero and Crema leather. RHD. via Maranello Concessionaires to D B James, UK (1), restored in ’90s, the Massini Report states that this car enjoyed long-term ownership of 30 years (1980 to 2010), Chris Evans ’90s, restored in the 1990s, the Dino was owned subsequently owned by broadcaster, motoring enthusiast and collector, Chris Evans. The current vendor advises us that the engine has been replaced and that the car was recently treated to a bare-metal repaint and full interior re-trim by independent Ferrari specialists, Hoyle Fox Classics. Related bills are on file and this very well presented car also comes with a V5C Registration Certificate and the all-important Ferrari Classiche certification. A total of 60,656 miles is currently displayed on the odometer.
24 1970 Ferrari 365GTB/4 13435 £520,000 £580,000 € 587,600 €655,400 $665,600 $742,400 Blu Metalizzato over Crema and Nero leather. 1 of 158 in RHD. via Maranello Concessionaires to British School of Motoring/Denise McCann, UK (1), John Lloyd ’72 (2), William French, Australia ’74 (3), Joe Macari, UK ’13 (4), Ferrari Classiche certification for it in 2013, confirming that ‘13435’ retains its original engine and gearbox. The history file contains paperwork detailing the original order; specification and build details; purchase invoices; and records of service work carried out during BSM’s ownership. MoT’d and offered with a V5C registration document, ‘13435’ represents a wonderful opportunity to own a rare original right-hand drive example of the defining sports car of its generation.
25 1964 Aston Martin DB5 Saloon DB5/1926/R £640,000 £680,000 € 723,200 €768,400 $819,200 $870,400 Goodwood Green over Beige leather. RHD. via J. Blake to L J Grundon, UK (1), various, very well maintained by Ian Mason and Nicholas Mee, over the last 20 years the car has benefited from extensive mechanical restoration, which included rebuilding the original engine to 4.2-litre ‘unleaded’ specification; various suspension upgrades; braking system overhaul; and sundry other maintenance works, while all the time preserving its originality. More recently it has been repainted in its original exterior colour by classic-car restoration specialists, Thames Valley Repairs Limited, at a cost of over £12,000 (bills on file), previous MoTs; and the aforementioned BMIHT Certificate.
26 1993 Jaguar XJ220C Competition Coupe 002 £2,200,000 £2,800,000 € 2,486,000 €3,164,000 $2,816,000 $3,584,000 Green Unipart over Black semi race. RHD. Le Mans ’93 #50 Nielsen/Brabham/Coulthard 15th, 1st IC, Disq, stored in TWR Museum, Sultan of Brunei (1), William Loughran ’99 (2), unknown (3), vendor (4). As last raced.
27 2011 Ferrari 599 GTO 181050 £500,000 £600,000 € 565,000 €678,000 $640,000 $768,000 Rosso Corsa and Nero over Crema and Nero leather. 1 of 60 in RHD. Representing a rare opportunity to acquire a low-mileage, right-hand drive, UK-market example, chassis number ‘181050’ was delivered on 28th June 2011 and has covered only 3,600 miles from new. Presented in immaculate condition, it is finished in Rosso Corsa with Nero roof and Grigio alloy wheels, just like the launch cars. The interior is equipped with an Alcantara-trimmed roll cage and four-point safety harnesses, and is upholstered in beige leather with black inserts. The accompanying service booklet records four visits to main dealers for routine servicing, the most recent occasion being in January 2018 at 3,492 miles. Ferrari pulled off a rare trick with the 599 GTO, creating a truly versatile car that is as exciting on the racetrack as it is civilised on the road. There can be little doubt that this modern icon will be a collectible future classic, and few would disagree with Autocar’s conclusion: ‘This is a genuine landmark car for Ferrari… a bona fide addition to the GTO family, make no mistake’.
28 1958 BMW 507 Roadster 70100 £2,100,000 £2,200,000 € 2,373,000 €2,486,000 $2,688,000 $2,816,000 Red and Black over Grey. Wolfgang Denzel, Austria (1), unknown, Count Albrecht Graf von Goertz, fitted with a replacement engine by Autohaus Martini, unnamed ’85, restored, unnamed, German vendor. The aforementioned documents, and others, may be found in the accompanying 86-page illustrated valuation report compiled by Dipl.-Ing. Klaus Kukuk, dated 26th October 2018, which also contains photographs of Albrecht Graf von Goertz inspecting his former car (perusal recommended). Good, restored condition,
29 1979 Rolls-Royce Phantom VI Limousine PGH116 £250,000 £300,000 € 282,500 €339,000 $320,000 $384,000 Black and Burgundy over Red leather. RHD. The last word in motoring luxury in its day, Phantom VI chassis number ‘PGH 116’ was built by Rolls-Royce to serve as the flagship of its demonstration fleet and as such incorporates a host of ‘extras’ in addition to the already generous standard specification. Dated 22nd November 1978, a (copy) factory document on file lists the full specification. This car has remained in factory ownership from new and loaned to the Royal Household on several occasions.
30 2017 Aston Martin Vanquish Zagato SCFLLCPZ7JGJ33598 £550,000 £650,000 € 621,500 €734,500 $704,000 $832,000 Ming Blue over Ivory/Aurora Blue leather. Very highly optioned. 101 miles from new. Representing a wonderful opportunity to acquire what, in its maker’s own words is ‘a truly exclusive and highly prized GT that promises to be as iconic an Aston Martin as it is sought after’, this beautiful British supercar comes complete with all books/tools, a V5C Registration Certificate, and its original factory purchase pack.


All information is copyright Auto Auctions Monthly except images which are copyright of Artcurial, Bonhams, Gooding & co., Mecum, RM/ Sothebys, Russo & Steele and Worldwide Auctioneers. All figures are US$ and gross unless specifically stated. All figures are accurate in the home currency for the sale, any figures in other currencies are calculated based on the exchange rate for the date of sale accessed from FxTop.com. Percentages as given are calculated as the % below low estimate or above estimate as noted. All information given for recreational use only and cannot be personally guaranteed for accuracy by the author.

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